Find An Investing Mentor Or Coach

When you listen to very successful people, one of the factors they often cite as having contributed to their success is having a mentor.

The presence of someone other than yourself in your life that has your best interest in mind can be huge. A mentor can cut your learning curve in half by showing you the right way to do something, because he’s already been there and done that.

That kind of coaching is priceless.

When I worked at Spear, Leeds and Kellogg, first as an assistant and later as a trader, my mentor was a guy named Jimmy Morris. He was an incredibly nice man, and taught me everything he knew about how to make markets in a stock. When I left Jimmy and became my own trader, I was armed with everything he taught me during our time working together.

After Spear Leeds was bought by Goldman Sachs, most of us were gone within a few years and unfortunately lost touch.

It took years for me to find another mentor, but I did – and I’ve never even met him in person.

His name is David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool.

When I worked on Wall Street, I had a short-term trader’s mentality. The thought of buying something and holding on to it for years was not in my consciousness. Most of the traders that worked on the trading desk had that same mentality.

It wasn’t until I started listening to the Rule Breaker Investing podcast that I learned about compounding your money over many, many years.

In the late 90s, I sat front row for the the birth of companies that would go on to transform the world we lived in: AOL, Amazon, Google and eBay, among others. I came very close to pulling the trigger on Amazon…but I got talked out of it. What a huge mistake that was!

Buying and holding Amazon from 1997 to now would have generated incredible wealth. The only question is: would I, in fact, have held it all this time?

The answer to that question is “probably not” – and the main reason would be attributed to not having had a mentor.

You see, a mentor will help you to not make the number one mistake most investors make – which is selling too soon.

Even the great investors can make this mistake! Case in point: in 1965, Warren Buffett invested $4,000,000 in Disney after meeting with Walt Disney himself. About a year later, he sold the stock after a 50% gain. Now, turning $4,000,000 in to $6,000,000 is a fantastic return…however, if Warren had held on to his investment, he would have made 2870 times his money. His total return would have been close to $11.5 billion.

If today’s Warren could have mentored younger Warren, I’m sure he would have told him to buy and hold.

 

My book, The Stock Market is For Everyone, is a short guide for the beginning, inexperienced investor that is easy to understand and can be put into action immediately.

Click the image of the book at left to be taken to its Amazon page.  (Disclosure: As a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, I earn a small commission on each sale generated through these links.)

 

Advertisements

Is Roku A Millionaire Maker?

On September 28, 2017, Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU) made its public debut.

At the close of the day, the price was $23.50 a share. In the weeks following its IPO, the stock traded below $17 a share. No one gave it a second thought…

…until Roku reported its first earnings as a public company, and the stock shot up 57%, from around $17 to $26 overnight.

Roku’s earnings caught everyone by surprise, as they beat analysts’ expectations on the top and bottom line.

Today, a $1000 investment in Roku’s IPO is up 540%.

That begs the question: is Roku a millionaire maker?

The answer is: no one knows for sure. But the one thing I do know is that Roku has the qualities that could make it a very big winner over time.

Throughout history, companies that have gone on to become big winners usually have a founder/CEO who is a visionary. Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) had Bill Gates; Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL), Steve Jobs; and Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) has Jeff Bezos.

Meet Anthony Wood – the quiet, unassuming visionary CEO behind Roku’s rise.

Although Roku started out as a hardware company, selling sticks, their plan all along was to ultimately become the operating system for streaming video on demand.

Streaming video on demand will be one of the largest secular trends over the next 10 to 15 years. TV – and TV advertising dollars – are in the beginning stages of a very big shift to streaming video.

In that time, Roku has become the leading platform for streaming video on demand.

It doesn’t matter who wins the streaming video war between Netflix, Amazon, Disney, Hulu or any other player. They will all be accessible via Roku.

Here are some numbers that illustrate Roku’s potential:

  • 29,000,000 active accounts
  • Average amount of time users spend on Roku daily: 3.5 hours
  • Amount of content streamed in 2018: 14.8 billion hours
  • If you look at Roku in terms of users, it is the 3rd largest cable provider in the country.
  • Roku TV is the number one licensed TV in the US.
  • One in four smart TVs in the US are Roku TVs.

Right now, Roku has a market value of $11 billion. If the company continues to execute and becomes the operating system for streaming video on demand, that market cap could grow exponentially.

So…is Roku a millionaire maker?

I can’t say for sure. But it has a chance to be!

My book, The Stock Market is For Everyone, is a short guide for the beginning, inexperienced investor that is easy to understand and can be put into action immediately.

Click the image of the book at left to be taken to its Amazon page. 

(Disclosure: As a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, I earn a small commission on each sale generated through these links.)