How Much You Invest Doesn’t Matter!

Good morning!

Earlier this week, I posted an Ask Wealthy Joe question from someone who wanted to start investing but was unable to come up with the funds to do so out of her regular paychecks.  I advised her to use 20 percent of her income tax refund.

Now, suppose your tax refund is $1,000.  20 percent of that is $200.  That’s not a lot of money, and I know that some of you are wondering why you should bother if that’s all you have.

I know this because in The Stock Market is For Everyone, I suggest to people that they begin with a small amount out of every paycheck, and I have been asked how that could possibly make a difference in one’s financial future.

There’s a misperception that you need a lot of money to start investing.  That is NOT THE CASE!

Here’s the thing: The most important factor in your success as an investor is the performance of the asset class – in this case, the stock.

I said this the other day when I was talking about how people make the mistake of choosing penny stocks because they can get more shares for their money.

“What would my little $100 do?” you ask.

Well, the answer is “it depends.”

If you invest in a company that doesn’t perform, then your money won’t grow very much.  That’s the same whether you invest $100 or $100,000.

For example, let’s say you bought one share of IBM (NYSE: IBM) in 2006 at $82.20 a share.  That investment would be worth $136.80 today.  That would be a 66% return over 13 years.

Let’s compare that to buying one share of Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) in 2006 for $71.89.  That investment would now be worth $1669, or 23 times your investment.

Get it?

Obviously, the more you have to invest, the more you can gain.  I encourage you to invest as much as you possibly can!

However, the performance of the stock trumps the amount you invested.

My book, The Stock Market is For Everyone, is a short guide for the beginning, inexperienced investor that is easy to understand and can be put into action immediately.

Click the image of the book at left to be taken to its Amazon page.  (Disclosure: As a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, I earn a small commission on each sale generated through these links.)

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Is Clorox A Buy?

buy clorox stock

I wrote this post for new investors that may be risk-averse.

If you’re like me, you have a high tolerance for risk.  You will have a portfolio that consists of companies on the cusp of innovative disruption.  These companies’ stock prices tends to be quite volatile.  You could be up 200%, and then give back more than half in weeks.

That kind of price movement may not sit well with some investors.  If you fall in this category that’s fine, because I have a suggestion for you: Clorox!

Now, I am a believer that many old-line companies are in big trouble.  They’re simply not moving fast enough to remain competitive.  However, Clorox (NYSE: CLX) is unique.  I believe they will continue to outperform the market for many years to come.

Clorox makes products that we must have on a daily or weekly basis, and that’s simply not going away.  Consider the brands they own:

1. Clorox Wipes

2. Clorox Bleach

3. Hidden Valley Salad Dressing

4. Pine-Sol

5. Burt’s Bees

6. Glad

7. Brita Water Filters

8. Kingsford Charcoal

9. Fresh Step Cat Litter

10. Liquid-Plumr

I think you could sleep at night if you owned these brand names.  You’re not going to set the world on fire in the way you would if you owned an Amazon or a Netflix, but that might not be your style.

That’s why I believe Clorox is a good choice for risk-averse investors.

Disclaimer/Disclosure Statement: Information in this article is not intended to be a recommendation to invest in any stock.  Rather, it is presented for readers’ education and consideration when making their own investment decisions.  The author has no position in any of the companies mentioned.

 

My book, The Stock Market is For Everyone, is a short guide for the beginning, inexperienced investor that is easy to understand and can be put into action immediately.

Click the image of the book at left to be taken to its Amazon page.  (Disclosure: As a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, I earn a small commission on each sale generated through these links.)